Topics Forums Leopard Geckos Mistreated Leopard gecko

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    • #19349
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      Shannon
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      I recently became responsible for two Leo’s. One of them is half the size of the other and I know they are at least 3 years old. After looking at average weights they are small for their age at 16gms and 34gms. The smaller one has what I assume are several layers of stuck shed on one of her eyes 😢 and the other eye has shed under it that I’m working on. I have managed to get her toes free of shed. She is not a fan of me messing with her stuck shed and has bitten me a few times. I have no idea what to do about her “bad” eye. She does not like me using wet q-tips around her good eye or mouth area. They didn’t have a heating lamp, moist hides or a very clean enclosure. I have fixed those problems I am and turning their light off at night. I offer them crickets and mealworms, I have ordered horn worms and another worm I can’t remember the name of lol. I am trying to hand feed the little one and I have been able get her to eat a few meal worms, crickets, 2 or 3 daily. I am dusting the worms and crickets with calcium with d3 and I have small dish of calcium in their enclosure as well.

      The larger one has no problems with shed or eating. They seem to get along well. The day after I put the heating pad on and the moist hide in I found them both in the hide with the little one sleeping on the larger one. Since then they seem to take turns. There is another moist hide but it’s in the cool area.

      Anyway, can any of you think of other things I should be doing? I’m very concerned about the little ones eye and size.

      Thanks in advance.

    • #19362
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      Zoodulcis
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      This is a terrible situation!! You are very brave for taking this on. The only suggestion I have is to gently spray decholorinated water that is room temperature onto their stuck sheds twice daily. Wait 48 hours and see if they are able to rub it off themselves. Which seems unlikely at this point. If they can’t, then you may have to try to work it off even if they bite. Gloves will help. This may end up being a job for a vet.

      Let us know if this course of action helps. Why do people take on pets they can’t care for!!! It’s good that they are now in your care.

      • #19373
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        Shannon
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        Thanks for the suggestion, I’ll try that too. I’ve attached pictures of both of them.

        • #19381
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          Zoodulcis
          Moderator

          An additional thought on solving the stuck shed occurred to me. If you have access to mineral oil, you might want to use a tiny, tiny bit right on the crusty area after moistening. Many homes are so dry in winter, like mine, that even misting twice a day would not keep those tissues pliable. A little mineral may help to seal the moisture in between mistings. Do not use vegetable oil of any kind, as this can become attractive to bacteria.

          Judging from the size of the tail, the one in the photo is not undernourished, but given what you’ve described of their previous care, they may be malnourished. Try to avoid feeding mealworms since leopard geckos have a really short digestive tract and mealworms are almost all chitin, so not terribly nutritious. Be sure to gut-load all food items no more than 24 hours prior to offering them to your guys for maximum nutrition. A vitamin-mineral supplement in addition to calcium is probably an excellent call as well.

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